Guadeloupe


Guadeloupe - Ready to borrowAnyone on a cruise Guadeloupe disembarked a cruise ship, entered a French overseas department and paid a visit to a Caribbean outpost of the European Union. Guadeloupe is part of the Lesser Antilles archipelago.

It's between the islands Montserrat and Antigua in the north and Dominica in the south. Several inhabited and some uninhabited islands make up the Guadeloupe department. When Guadeloupe is commonly spoken of, it refers to the 1.628 km² main island, whose shape is reminiscent of a butterfly. Which is why they also have romantic minds Butterfly Island is called.

The two butterfly wings Basse-Terre (in the west) and Grande Terre (to the east) a narrow arm of the sea, only 50 meters wide, separates the Riviere Salee. Basse-Terre is of volcanic origin. Remarkably high mountains tower up inland. Of the Soufrière as the highest point, an active volcano, it rises to an impressive 1.467 meters. The 17.300 hectare area extends around the mountain National park. Due to its geographical conditions, Basse-Terre is very rainy. Tropical forests shape the landscape here. Grande-Terre, on the other hand, is based on sand-lime brick and is relatively flat compared to the neighboring island. Basse-Terre is mostly nature, while Grande-Terre is the tourist center of Guadeloupe.

Guadeloupe - tropical forest

Guadeloupe - tropical forest


The history of Guadeloupe is quickly told. Discovered by none other than Columbus, the colonization by France began in 1635. Apart from brief intervals, the island remained in French possession. Guadeloupe lost its colony status in 1946. From then on, the region is a French overseas department. It sends delegates to the French National Assembly and the Senate.

Not only politically, but also economically, the territory is part of the European Union. The economic performance is to be assessed as weak. As a result of an extremely high unemployment rate, the purchasing power index of the Antilles island is well below comparable European values. The economic focal points of Guadeloupe are agriculture, tourism, light industry and services. Tourism is strongly promoted by the mother country.

The largest city, administrative center and economic focus is Punchlineà-Pitre. The city lies on Grande-Terre, the right wing of the butterfly, on the connecting line to Basse-Terre. The greater Pointe-à-Pitre area is likely to have around 100.000 inhabitants. Cruise ships call at the port of Pointe-à-Pitre.

Guadeloupe - a first look

Guadeloupe - a first look


 

 

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