Cavenagh Bridge

Singapore attractions


The city-state of Singapore, with a population of almost 5,9 million, is one of the cleanest, safest and most exciting regions in the world. The sights listed below are far from complete. They are intended as a recommendation for travelers who cannot stay in Singapore for more than two days. It would take a lot more time to see all of the interesting targets. The city-state owes its special atmosphere to the British colonial rulers as well as the immigrant Chinese and Malays.

View of Singapore's Financial District

View of Singapore's Financial District


Singapore's main attractions

Marina Bay region

The Marina Bay region is characterized by remarkable and gigantic buildings and installations. The sights mentioned below were built on washed up land.

Gardens by the Bay

A portion of nature in the middle of the megacity of Singapore! A total of 101 hectares are used for a spectacular and varied garden. The artificial trees of the Supertree Grove are extremely impressive. The trees in the "grove" are between 25 and 50 meters high. A 128-meter-long, 22-meter-high path called the Skyway connects two of the trees. Breathtaking views are guaranteed on the Skyway.

Access to the Skyway costs 8 SGD. Tickets are sold near the entrance to the Skyway.

The two glass biotopes of the Flower Dome and Cloud Forest show plants from different climatic zones. The larger of the two greenhouses is the Flower Dome. Plants that are typical of Mediterranean and semi-arid climates thrive in it. In 2015, the Flower Dome was included in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest glass greenhouse in the world. The building covers 1,28 hectares. In the smaller of the two biotopes, the Cloud Forest (0,73 hectares), the vegetation zone of the tropics is simulated. Plants thrive there that grow up to 2.000 meters above sea level.

Supertree Grove and Skywalk


Supertree Grove and Skywalk


Flower Dome and Cloud Forest


Flower Dome and Cloud Forest 


Marina Bay Sands

The Marina Bay Sands is an extraordinary hotel resort. The 20-hectare complex offers many special features: three 55-story hotel towers, a casino and a conference and exhibition center. The hotel has 2.561 rooms and around 50 bars and restaurants. The highlight is the Sands SkyPark, a platform that protrudes 191 meters above the hotel towers. The 12.000 square meter and 340 meter long area was designed as a tropical oasis. The 146 meter long infinity pool is an eye-catcher on the terrace. It is said to be the highest pool in the world.

Marina Bay Sands Hotel

Marina Bay Sands Hotel


Marina Bay Sands also has a shopping center, an art and science museum, two theaters and two floating pavilions.

The north-eastern area of ​​the viewing terrace is open to visitors. In 2020, adults pay 23 SGD to enter.

Marina Bay Sands and Art Science Museum
Marina Bay Sands - observation deck
Marina Bay Sands Sky Park
Marina Bay Sands - the children's area

Art Science Museum

Next to the Marina Bay Sands hotel complex is the Art Science Museum. It was built in the shape of a lotus flower. With its ten fingers, it symbolizes Singapore's open hand. Light flows through the fingertips into the building. The more than 4.000 square meters of exhibition space is spread over three floors.

Art Science Museum

Art Science Museum


Merlion

Singapore's landmark, the Merlion Fountain, stands in front of the skyline of the financial district. The water-spouting mythical creature has the body of a fish (mermaid) and the head of a lion (lion). The gargoyle is 8,60 meters high. The fish part of the structure symbolizes the roots of the East Asian port city and trading metropolis reaching into the sea. The lion head stands for pride, power and strength.

The Merlion

The Merlion


The Merlion hurls a huge jet of water towards the bay. A miniature merlion placed nearby spits water in the direction of the financial district. Maybe another allegory?

Marina Bay Street Circuit Racecourse

Singapore has had a racetrack since 2008. The Formula 1 races are held on a five-kilometer circuit. The special thing about this race: It is a night race. Most of the route is on public roads. From the observation deck of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel, visitors look directly onto the race track and the grandstands. 

Singapore Flyer

The 165-meter-high "Singapore Flyer" has been rotating since March 1st, 2008. The world's second tallest Ferris wheel has 28 gondolas. Each gondola holds a maximum of 28 people. One rotation is completed after 30 minutes. It goes without saying that the gondolas are air-conditioned.

Singapore Flyer and Formula 1 racetrack


Singapore Flyer and Formula 1 racetrack


Singapore Flyer and Formula 1 racetrack


Singapore Flyer and Formula 1 racetrack 


 

 

The Singapore River

Thomas Stamford Raffles landed on the four-kilometer-long Singapore River in 1819. The place seemed to him suitable to build a trading post for the British East India Company. The right decision: the later success proved him right.

In the 19th century the river was an indispensable traffic artery. It has since lost its economic importance. It is always suitable as a tourist attraction. The River Walk connects the former wharfs Boat Quay, Clarke Quay and Robertson Quay. A stroll along the water leads past numerous restaurants, bars and clubs. The Singapore River can be navigated day and evening with bumboats (water taxis) and junks. The boat trips offer good views of the sights along the way.

Some bridges cross the river. Most of the ornate bridges were built in the early 19th century. They seem correspondingly traditional today. The most striking bridge over the Singapore River, however, is the modern Helix Bridge. The bold building is interpreted as a representation of the DNA structure. After dark there is a daily laser show with background music.

Helix bridge

Helix bridge


Singapore is a rich state. This is proven not least by the art installations set up along the Singapore River. Works by top-class artists such as Fernando Botero or Salvador Dali were displayed along the River Walk. But also impressive works by less well-known artists adorn the urban landscape.

The colonial district

The British colonial rulers shaped Singapore between 1819 and 1959. Singapore's colonial district has many historical buildings that were built during this time. Significant and noteworthy buildings are the National Museum of Singapore, the National Gallery and the Old Supreme Court Building. Next door, the New Supreme Court is presented in a modern and future-oriented design.

Other historical attractions include the Victoria Theater, City Hall, Parliament House and St. Andrew's Cathedral. On the banks of the Singapore River stands the tall statue of the city's founder, Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles. The Raffles Hotel, named after the city's founder, is undoubtedly one of the district's institutions.

Singapore's colonial district


Singapore's colonial district


The Fullerton Hotel with the Merlion


The Fullerton Hotel with the Merlion 


The Fullerton Hotel

Opposite the colonial district, on the other side of the Singapore River, is the luxury hotel The Fullerton. This imposing building is also a historic landmark, and it wasn't always a hotel. From 1928 onwards it was used as Singapore's main post office. It was only after 1997 that it was converted into the Fullerton Hotel. 

Chinatown

Well over 70 percent of Singapore's population are of Chinese descent. The foundation stone for the settlement area of ​​the Chinese immigrants was laid in 1828. At that time it still seemed sensible to separate the ethnic groups according to their origin. This is how the districts of Chinatown and Little India came into being.

Chinatown is one of Singapore's main attractions for tourists. The exotic design of the quarter, the lively life, the Chinese cuisine, diverse shopping opportunities and attractive temples make Chinatown a destination well worth seeing.

Pagoda Street in Chinatown

Pagoda Street in Chinatown


Two of the most impressive temples are the Buddhist Buddha Tooth Relic Temple and the Hindu Sri Mariamman Temple. The Chinatown Heritage Center provides visitors with a wide range of information about the past and present of the quarter.

Chinatown Heritage Center
Location: 48 Pagoda Street.
Hours of Operation: 09:00am to 20:00pm
Closed every first Monday of the month.
Entrance fee adults: 15 SGD including multimedia guide

Singapore's China Town - Pagoda Street


Singapore's China Town - Pagoda Street


Singapore's China Town - Sri Mariamman Temple


Singapore's China Town - Sri Mariamman Temple 


Orchard Road

Singapore's shopping mile is Orchard Road. Forget Hamburg's Jungfernstieg, forget the Düsseldorfer Kö and forget the Zeil in Frankfurt. In Singapore's Orchard Road, gigantic malls are lined up on both sides of the street.

Orchard Road

Orchard Road


From simple to noble and very expensive shops everything is offered. Every label introduced is represented on Orchard Road. There are often several flagship stores of well-known brands. And nobody threatens to starve to death in the malls. Foodies get their money's worth in the basement. Orchard Road is an absolute "must".

The easiest way to get to know Orchard Road: Walk from Orchard MRT Station towards Dhoby Ghaut MRT Station.

Singapore especially for cruise passengers

Cruise terminals

Cruise ships dock at three piers in Singapore. The most popular cruise terminal is Marina South Pier. The pier offers space for two large cruise ships at the same time. Currency exchange, a coffee shop, luggage storage and tourist information are available.

Cruise Terminal - Marina South Pier

Cruise Terminal - Marina South Pier


Use of public transport:

Tour buses and taxis stop in and in front of the basement. A covered path leads from the terminal through a green area to the underground station about 600 meters away. It's called Marina South Pier.

Singapore - Marina South Pier Metro Station


Singapore - Marina South Pier Metro Station


Singapore's meticulously clean subway cars

 
Singapore's meticulously clean subway cars 


Singapore's public transport system is highly developed. The extremely clean subways (MRT) and buses are the cheapest means of transport in Singapore. The purchase of a day pass is recommended for day visitors who want to see a lot of the city on their own with buses and trains. Day tickets are sold in the MRT stations. But taxis are also available everywhere and much more affordable than in Germany. The 18-kilometer route from the Cruise Terminal to Changi International Airport costs around 30 US dollars.

Update March 2021

 

 

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