Custom house

Dublin attractions


Dublin - the first impression

Ireland's metropolis Dublin presents itself to its visitors as a compact, clear and well-kept city at first glance. The main sights of the city with around 553.000 inhabitants are located in a small area.

O'Connell Street and O'Connell Memorial

O'Connell Street and O'Connell Memorial


Dublin must-see boroughs for visitors

Our favorites for a day stay in Dublin are:                                    

  • Downtown
  • Temple Bar district
  • Government District
  • Dublin's Docklands with administrative buildings and avant-garde bridges

The city center impresses its visitors with many representative buildings. The Liffey River and its old bridges are just as recommended for a walk as the once simple district of Temple Bar, which has been transformed into a delightful trendy district. Government buildings and museums are located close to one another in the manageable government district that appears close to the people. The harbor district with its modern buildings and bridges is a symbol of Ireland's dawning into a new era. Dublin's botanical gardens, public parks and green spaces stand for quality of life.

Temple Bar District - Brewery Lane

Temple Bar District - Brewery Lane


Dublin's bridges

The Liffey River divides Dublin into a northern and a southern district. It is great fun to follow the river promenades on foot. At the Docklands level, the river becomes noticeably wider. There beautiful old and spectacular new bridges connect both banks of the river.

We consider two historical bridges to be outstanding:

O'Connell Bridge
Dublin's main bridge is as long as it is wide. 

Ha'penny Bridge
In earlier times, half a penny bridge toll had to be paid for their use.

Dublin - O'Connell Bridge
Dublin - Ha'penny Bridge
Dublin - Seán O'Casey Bridge
Dublin - Samuel Beckett Bridge

Great new bridges are those

Seán O'Casey Bridge
The approximately 100 meter long bridge is divided in half. The bridge segments can be swiveled by 90 degrees for the passage of ships. 

Samuel Beckett Bridge
The pylon of the spectacular 120-meter-long cable-stayed bridge rises 48 meters into the sky. Its creator is the Spanish star architect Santiago Calatrava. The master designed many bridges. This bridge is similar to the Puente de la Mujer in Buenos Aires

Buildings that should be seen 

General Post Office (GPO)
The Irish freedom fighters made the historic GPO their headquarters in the 1916 Easter Rising.

General Post Office

General Post Office


Government Buildings
These include the Irish Parliament, Leinster House, the seat of government and the Treasury. 

City Hall
Dublin's columned City Hall was built between 1769 and 1779.

Dublin-Leinster House


Dublin-Leinster House


Dublin - City Hall


Dublin - City Hall 


Four courts
The mighty building with the Corinthian columns and its dome is more like a church or a monastery. In fact, the highest courts in Ireland use the building. The Four Courts were built between 1786 and 1802.

Dublin - Four Courts - the supreme courts


Dublin - Four Courts - the supreme courts


Dublin - Custom House


Dublin - Custom House 


Custom house
The classical building, originally used as a customs office, was built between 1781 and 1791. It is currently used by the Ministry of the Environment and the city administration. 

Dublin Castle
On the foundations of a Viking fortress, England's King John Ohneland (John Lackland) had the Dublin Castle built. After a devastating fire in the 17th century, a palace was built in place of the castle. The center of the facility is the Record Tower from Norman times. Dublin Castle is the appropriate location for official acts of state of the republic.

Dublin Castle - Bedford Hall and Bedford Tower

Dublin Castle - Bedford Hall and Bedford Tower


Trinity College
Dublin has several universities and colleges. Trinity College from 1592 is particularly worth seeing. The college, originally set up for Protestant students, is located between the Temple Bar district and the government district.

Trinity College
Regent House & Partliament Square
Trinity College Theater
Moyne Institute & College Park


Address: College Green

The university campus is freely accessible. The highlights of the classicist buildings are the approximately 30 meter high campanile and the 64 meter long and 12 meter high hall of the Old Library. This library houses the 8th century Book of Kells and Ireland's oldest harp. If you want to see the manuscript, which is part of the world documentary heritage, you have to be patient. The queues in front of the building don't want to end.

Queuing for the Book of Kells

Queuing for the Book of Kells



 

Dublin's cathedrals

Dublin has three cathedrals. Two belong to the Church of Ireland. The smaller of the two, Christ Church Cathedral, is today's bishopric. Construction began in the last quarter of the 12th century. It got its current appearance in the 16th century. 

Address: Christchurch Place

Dublin - Christ Church Cathedral


Dublin - Christ Church Cathedral


Dublin - St. Patrick's Cathedral


Dublin - St. Patrick's Cathedral 


The other is St. Patrick's Cathedral. It is significantly larger than the Christ Church Cathedral. At 91 meters long, it is the largest church in Ireland. 

Address: St. Patrick's Close

The third is St. Mary's Pro-Cathedral. It is the episcopal church of the Roman Catholic Church. The classicist building was built between 1814 and 1825.

Address: 83 Marlborough Place

Marsh's Library

Hidden behind St. Patrick's Cathedral is Ireland's oldest public library, founded in 1701 by Archbishop Narcissus Marsh. It survived the 300 years of its existence almost unchanged. Their characteristics: precious old books, manuscripts and maps as well as cages for the readers. The cages were set up to protect the valuable reading material against theft.

Marsh's Library

Marsh's Library


Address: Saint Patrick's Close

Dublin's most important museums and galleries

The most important museums in Dublin include the National Gallery, the Irish Museum of Modern Art and the former prison Kilmainham Gaol.

National Gallery of Ireland
The National Gallery houses an important collection of European and especially Irish painting.

National Gallery

National Gallery


Address: Merrion Square West & Clare Street

Natural History Museum
People of all ages are drawn to the zoo of dead animals. Over 10.000 prepared creatures are shown. The concept of the collection has hardly changed for 150 years.
Address: Merrion St. Upper

Kilmainham Gaol
The largest (unused) prison in Europe is dedicated to the history of the Irish struggle for independence. The prison conditions in the prison, which was built in 1795 and closed in 1924, must have been terrible. Visitors can find out more about it on guided tours.
Address: Inchicore Road, in the suburb of Kilmainham

Dublin's parks and gardens

Dublin visitors can choose between eleven public parks and gardens. We particularly recommend two parks to day visitors. It's Merrion Square in the Government District and St. Stephen's Green Park.

Merrion Square is a beautiful, rectangular park. Historic street lamps and sculptures decorate the complex. One shows the Irish poet Oscar Wilde in a dandy pose lounging on a rock. You have to see it. His sculpture can be found in the northwest part of the garden.

Merrion Square - Oscar Wilde Monument


Merrion Square - Oscar Wilde Monument


Dublin - St. Stephen's Green


Dublin - St. Stephen's Green 


The War Memorial is located in the southwestern corner: an eternal flame burns in a stone pyramid. Across the street are the National Museum of Ireland, the National Gallery and, somewhat offset and separated by a green area, Leinster House.

St. Stephen's Green extends on Merrion Row and off Grafton Street. On an area of ​​around 200 by 150 meters you can see old trees and bushes, flower meadows, bodies of water, all sorts of aquatic animals and many people who spend their time there on nice days. It is hard to imagine that public executions took place in this peaceful location in the 18th century.

Dublin's monuments & sculptures 

Impressive and at the same time frightening are the two monuments that commemorate the sufferings and victims of the Great Irish Famine between 1845 and 1849. One of the memorials is in the entrance area of ​​St. Stephen's Green. The other is on Custom House Quay between Custom House and the Sean O'Casey Bridge.

Dublin - St. Stephen's Green - Famine Memorial


Dublin - St. Stephen's Green - Famine Memorial


Dublin - Custom House Quay - Famine Memorial


Dublin - Custom House Quay - Famine Memorial 


In Dublin city center, at the intersection of O'Connell Street Upper and N East Street, stands the unmistakable metal column called The Spire. The 121 meter high, upwardly tapering object was built in 2003 after the millennium celebrations. It's officially called the Monument of Light. No wonder, the stainless steel needle is illuminated at night.

The spire

The spire


The Italian sculptor Arnaldo Pomodoros has created various sculptures with the name Sphere within Sphere worldwide. A copy is on the Trinity College grounds in front of the Berkeley Library. It resembles the sculpture The Sphere set up in Battery Park, Manhattan / New York. This was originally at the World Trade Center. When the attack on the high-rise complex, it was buried by the debris from the collapsing skyscraper and badly damaged. After it was recovered, it received a new one

Dublin - Sphere within a Sphere


Dublin - Sphere within a Sphere


Dublin - Monument to Molly Mallone


Dublin - Monument to Molly Mallone 


An indispensable symbol of Dublin is the sculpture of Molly Malone. She portrays the young, pretty and open-hearted fishmonger Molly Malone. According to tradition, she lived in Dublin in the 17th century. She sold fish and mussels by day and herself by night. Her statue is on the corner of Grafton and Suffolk Street. 

Grafton Street - Dublin's shopping street

Grafton Street is Dublin's most famous shopping street. Interesting shops, street artists, Bewley's Café, which is known far beyond Dublin, and the posh department store Brown Thomas with its perfectly formed doorman attract visitors and buyers from all over the world.

Grafton Street - Brown Thomas Department Store


Grafton Street - Brown Thomas Department Store


Grafton Street - Doorman outside Brown Thomas Department Store


Grafton Street - Doorman outside Brown Thomas Department Store 


Beer and Irish whiskey - indispensable for connoisseurs and lovers

Guinness beer and Jameson whiskey belong to Dublin. The Guinness Storehouse and Jameson Distillery have each made beer and whiskey for more than two hundred years. Both companies organize guided tours and tastings for a fee.

Addresses and ticket prices:
Guinness Storehouse: St. Jame's Gate
Tickets: 30 euros if booked in advance

Jameson Distillery: 7 Bow Street
Tickets: 19 to 60 euros

Dublin for cruise ship guests

The quay reserved for cruise ships is close to the center. Visitors can get into the city in a few minutes by taxi. If the ships stay in Dublin for a whole day, it is possible to see the main sights without rushing. With careful preparation of the city tour, there is no need for a guided tour. How it is possible to arrange the mentioned tourist places in a meaningful way during a tour, we reveal below One day in Dublin.