Trondheim

Trondheim


Trondheim on the fjord of the same name is Norway's third largest city with 205.000 inhabitants (as of February 2020). It is the administrative center of the Trøndelag region, a university town and the location of many technology companies. It is also an important transport hub and the cultural center of Central Norway. 

Trondheim - historical 

The Trondheim region has been inhabited for more than 1.000 years. The city name was originally Nidaros. It goes back to the Vikings. Their king, Olav Tryggvason, had a trading post built on the banks of the Nidelva River. As a result, the later Trondheim developed into the most important city in Norway and the center of Christianization. At times the city was an important place of pilgrimage in Northern Europe. 

The Nidelva River

The Nidelva River


After the Reformation, Trondheim lost its importance. A major fire that destroyed parts of the city in 1681 also contributed to this. The benefit of the fire: During the reconstruction, permanent urban accents were set with the broad lines of sight that can still be found in the city center. The city regained economic status as a trading center and ore port in the 18th century.

The Munkegata in the center of Trondheim

The Munkegata in the center of Trondheim


Trondheim today

Trondheim is the administrative center of Central Norway. Part of the provincial government is in Trondheim. Well over 30.000 students are enrolled at the Technical and Natural Sciences University of Norway in Trondheim. It is Norway's second largest university after Oslo University. The University Hospital St. Olavs Hospital is of great importance for the region up to Svalbard. Due to its proximity to the university, many technology companies are based in Trondheim.

 

Nedre Bakklandet pedestrian zone

Nedre Bakklandet pedestrian zone


Trondheim looks clean and tidy and is surrounded by greenery. Impressive commercial buildings have recently been built in the area of ​​the cruise terminal. The city is crossed by the Nidelva River. In the center, modern residential buildings line the river. The jetties are in front of the house. Trondheim is without a doubt a liveable and lovable city.

Apartments on the Nidelva River

Apartments on the Nidelva River


 

 

Trondheim - cultural focus in central Norway

Cultural highlights are the Trøndelag Symphony Orchestra and the Trøndelag Theater. Museums and galleries are just as much a part of the cultural scene as the Dokkhuset music scene or the Rockheim Museum. The Dokkhuset is an old shipyard that has been converted into a music stage. The Rockheim is the national Norwegian museum of pop and rock. There are old and contemporary works of art everywhere in the cityscape, plus top sights such as Nidaros Cathedral. 

The Rockheim Museum

The Rockheim Museum


Trondheim - transport hub

Trondheim has an airport and offers train connections to Oslo, Bodø and neighboring Sweden. The Hurtigruten ships regularly call at Trondheim's port. The ships connect Trondheim with Bergen to the south and Kirkenes in the far north of Norway. 

The adventure pool opposite the cruise terminal

The cruise terminal opposite the adventure pool


Trondheim for cruise tourists

2018 cruise ship calls were planned for 68. On trips to the North Cape, the ships dock in Trondheim for a few hours. The city turns out to be a worthwhile and interesting stopover for its passengers. Although there has so far been a lack of an efficient handling terminal, the location of the investor is ideal. The short distances from the berth to the city center prove to be pleasant. The use of public transport is not required. Trondheim is one of those port cities that you can easily "discover" without guided tours. Under Trondheim sightseeing we report on the main attractions of the city.

Update June 2020 

 

 

 

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